By Northtowne Dentist on Friday, April 21st, 2017 in Uncategorized | No Comments

Soluble fiber is the apple’s hallmark contribution to health.  Apples are ‘fruits’ – the parts of flowering plants that bear seeds.  A medium-sized apple – about 3 inches in diameter – provides about 95 calories of energy, according to the National Nutrient Database of the US Department of Agriculture.  One apple provides about 25 grams of carbohydrates (in the form of fructose, a natural fruit sugar) of which 4 grams are in the form of dietary fiber (that’s good). 

While not a great source of vitamin C like citrus fruits and strawberries, apples’ claim to nutritional fame is soluble fiber.  This type of dietary fiber forms a gel in the intestinal tract that helps pull cholesterol out of the system.  And that’s good for keeping arteries clear.  Eat your apples with the skin to get the most benefit.

They help meet our daily quota for fruit.  According to the most current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, vegetarians and omnivores alike need to eat 1 to 2 cups of fruit, preferably whole fruit, each day.  And, we get the best mix of nutrients when we choose a variety of fruit, apples included.

Research suggest that an apple a day may help relieve springtime allergy symptoms. Apples, (especially their peels,) are rich in quercetin, a flavonoid that has a natural anti-inflammatory and antihistamine effect. Quercetin can help to prevent immune cells from releasing histamines, which cause an allergic response. These allergic responses are triggered by pollen and other allergies. According to one study by the British Thoracic Society that looked at the Crete diet, people whose diets included apples as a staple had greater protection against both allergies and asthma.

Apples are natural tooth brushes.  The high water and fiber content of whole fruit helps to clean the teeth when we munch says the ADA.  Crunching on fruit (and vegetables) also stimulates the production of saliva which can wash harmful acids away from our teeth.

Portable and convenient!  Throw an apple in your purse or backpack for a snack when daytime energy lulls.  Slap on some peanut butter or a slice of cheese and you have the perfect combination of protein and carbs, even for people with diabetes.

Are seasonal sniffles, sneezes, and itchy eyes taking the Spring out of your step? You need not look much further than your fruit bowl for some relief! Research suggest that an apple a day may help relieve springtime allergy symptoms. Apples, (especially their peels,) are rich in quercetin, a flavonoid that has a natural anti-inflammatory and antihistamine effect. Quercetin can help to prevent immune cells from releasing histamines, which cause an allergic response. These allergic responses are triggered by pollen and other allergies. According to one study by the British Thoracic Society that looked at the Crete diet, people whose diets included apples as a staple had greater protection against both allergies and asthma.


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